Curriculum Guide

Principal’s message

This curriculum handbook is provided for students and their parents as a guide to educational planning. The course selection process is an important part of students’ future academic development and employment plans. Queensbury High School offers numerous pathways to graduation. Students should develop a college and career readiness plan to ensure future success. They will be asked to assess future options, their academic strengths and weaknesses, and their personal academic preferences and goals.

In addition, all students will need to plan and complete those courses and New York State Regents Examinations that are required to earn a high school diploma. It is imperative that students choose their courses carefully to be in compliance with graduation requirements.

We have devised a course selection process that will provide the resources and information to assist students with important decisions. Teachers, department chairs and school counselors are available to provide any assistance needed as students and parents select courses and plan a program.

The curriculum handbook has been prepared in an effort to assist students as they strive for success in high school. We hope to enable students to maximize the high school experience and to develop their talents through both the academic and extracurricular program. Please keep this handbook available for reference purposes throughout the school year.

Damian Switzer
Queensbury High School Principal

Course guide

Art | Business | English | Foreign language | Math | Music | Physical education | Science | Social studies | Special education | Technology education

Art

Studio in Art – 1 Credit

Course fulfills the fine arts requirement.

An introductory course based on two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork with a variety of media: drawing, painting, color and design, printmaking, sculpture, pottery and digital art. Students will be encouraged to explore the fundamentals of art, different techniques, the elements and principles of design and a study of artists and art history.

Interior Design – 1/2 Credit

Course fulfills half of the fine arts requirement.

This studio course emphasizes the design process and space planning for modest size facilities, color rendering techniques and development of presentation skills and materials. Students will create, draw, render and select appropriate materials for various spaces in accordance with accepted design standards.

Drawing I – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Studio in Art

This introductory course will allow students to develop drawing skills by experimenting with a variety of drawing techniques, black and white media, minimal color and different surfaces. Students will proceed at a comfortable pace as they engage in drawing exercises that will strengthen their skills. Students will explore the work of renowned artists, participate in critiques, engage in creative problem solving and develop strong two dimensional work to include in their art portfolio.

Drawing II – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Drawing I

Students will explore multiple drawing techniques with color while advancing to a higher skill level of drawing. The students will learn how to use color theory and creative analysis to explore the endless possibilities that can make drawing fun and impulsive.

Advanced Drawing & Painting – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Level I and II in Drawing and/or Painting

Highly motivated students will challenge their drawing knowledge while provoking a curious attitude towards image making in a variety of mediums. Students will explore the sensations of seeing, thinking and interpreting images through drawing. The focus of this course will be to stimulate personal definitions of what may or may not be seen. Students will work through a series of projects to create a body of personal work.

Pottery I – ½ Credit

The fundamentals of clay and 3-D form are taught through the creation of useful, artistic vessels and hand-building techniques. Wheel throwing and glazing are introduced.

Pottery II – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Pottery I

This course continues with more advanced wheel throwing, clay designs and surface techniques. They will be explored with emphasis on individual student’s style with further exploration of both form and function.

Sculpture I – ½ Credit

3D design is explored through various media. Hand tools, found objects and other sculpture mediums are explored and linked to both historical and contemporary sculptors. Students will work with both additive and subtractive sculpture materials.

Sculpture II – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Sculpture I

Advanced 3D design is explored through more contemporary artists. Students will use various sculpture mediums, including plaster, ceramics, wood, metal and more. They will develop their own ideas with emphasis on the individual student’s style.

Advanced Pottery & Sculpture (NEW) – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Level I and II in Pottery and/or Sculpture

This course is a continuation to the fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Students will experiment with problem-solving strategies, mixed media projects, shape modification, movement, images, color and textured surfaces. Students will work through a variety of 3-D methods to develop a body of personal work.

Jewelry – ½ Credit

Students will be introduced to and experiment with a wide variety of jewelry materials and techniques for producing structurally sound, wearable art pieces. Projects will be linked to traditional and contemporary jewelry artists as students explore the concepts of inspiration and innovation, develop their own original designs and learn how to market their work.

Painting I – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Drawing I

An introductory course that surveys a wide range of painting techniques with a variety of painting mediums. Students will be encouraged to explore watercolor, acrylic and oil paint. The curriculum places an emphasis on exploration of artistic concepts, light, brushwork, composition, color theory and mixing.

Painting II – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Drawing I and Painting I

This course enables the highly motivated student to continue painting. It is an exploration of advanced techniques in different painting mediums and surfaces. Students are encouraged to bring personal experience into their artwork in a powerful way through conceptual art.

Photography I – ½ Credit

This course will explore visual communication through the use of a camera as a tool. Students will be introduced to Digital SLR cameras and Adobe Photoshop processing techniques. Students will be expected to participate in project-based problem solving activities. Creativity, innovation, responsibility, independence and self-directed learning will be explored.

SUNY Photography I – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Photography I

Building on knowledge and skills from Photography I, students will be introduced to alternative processes in photography and encouraged to begin to develop their own artistic style. Students will study the use of photography in fine art and commercial applications. Students enrolled have the opportunity to earn college credit from SUNY Adirondack. SUNY transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Graphic Design I – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Studio in Art

Through the introduction of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, students will explore different avenues of visual communication, self-expression and creative problem solving through the creation of commercial and fine art. This course will stress the acquisition and use of industry-appropriate language and technology in the field of graphic design.

Graphic Design II – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Graphic Design I

This course is for students who wish to advance their knowledge/body of work in graphic design. Students will examine graphic design as a vital component of society. Design will be used as a means of effective communication through building a strong understanding of color, design, typography, layout and advertising principles.

Advanced Photography & Graphic Design (NEW) – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Level I and II in Photography and/or Graphic Design

Highly motivated students will challenge their digital art skills by creating an advanced portfolio of design work and photography. This class emphasizes real world skills through experience with actual clients and community projects. Students will reflect upon and refine their work to develop their personal style. Students will utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art related careers.

Fashion Design – ½ Credit

Course fulfills half of the fine arts requirement.

In this course, students will learn and apply the elements of basic fashion design. Students will develop their own design ideas through croquis drawings and building fashion pieces. Emphasis on researching historical and contemporary designers and movements will be explored.

Visual Arts IB HL – 1 Credit

Grade 11
Prerequisite: Studio Art and Drawing I

This studio-based course emphasizes both students’ creative process and their final artistic product in two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional art forms. As students develop their craft, they will conduct thoughtful inquiry into their own thinking and art making processes, recording this learning in written and visual formats. All stages of the creative process must be thoroughly documented and evidence explained in depth. Investigation into chosen areas of interest and ideas for work must be shown and explained in detail. Students are expected to be independently motivated. They will learn to connect their own work, creating art that expresses personal meaning within the global context. This course is designed to enable students to study visual arts in higher education and welcomes those who seek life enrichment through visual arts. This course is a two-year commitment. Students must complete all IB requirements and have a passion for independently creating works of art.

Visual Arts IB HL YEAR II – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Visual Arts IB HL Year I

This course is a continuation of Year I. These studio-based courses emphasize both the students’ creative process and their final artistic product of two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional forms of art. This includes a “comparative study,” an independent critical and contextual investigation that explores artworks, objects and artifacts from differing cultural contexts; a “process portfolio,” which is a documentation of the student’s artistic experience during the course, both visual and written; and an “exhibition,” where students present a body of work accompanied by reflection showing critical understanding and awareness of context. The study of visual art, its processes and ideas, is a journey that offers rewards beyond the creation of art itself. Art requires ways of thinking and looking at the world, and in doing so, initiates a process of self-discovery and reflection that is part of a lifelong enrichment for the student. Students are expected to be independently motivated. The course is designed to enable students to study visual arts in higher education and welcomes those students who seek life enrichment through visual arts. Students must complete all IB requirements. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Back to course guide table of contents

Business

Accounting I – 1 Credit

Grades 10-12

This course introduces the basic accounting principles and practices for a business. Topics include the complete accounting cycle, creation of a balance sheet and income statement, bank reconciliation, investing and saving your money, payroll and how to complete your own income taxes. There will be an emphasis on budgeting your money, living within your ‘means’, and analyzing and interpreting financial information in an effort to make sound financial decisions. This course is a must for each and every student as it will offer financial knowledge for a lifetime!

Criminal & Personal Law – 1 CREDIT

Grades 10-12

Students will start out the year learning about how their own ethics and values play a role in decision making and either connect or conflict with our laws. The criminal justice system is then explored with actual criminal events and the consequences based on NYS Penal Laws and Vehicle and Traffic Laws. Students will broaden their understanding of our justice system with a visit to the Warren County Municipal Center to watch actual criminal proceedings and will have an opportunity to speak to the judges. Personal law topics will include civil lawsuits, contracts, marriage and divorce laws, buying a car and renting an apartment. Experiential learning will be enhanced with guest speakers, classroom debates, group work, videos and a career path project.

Business Law 1 – Credit

Grades 10-12

Business law is particularly useful because all students eventually assume the role of citizen, worker, and consumer in our society. Businesses operate in an increasingly global environment. As a result, business students must include in their academic preparation a basic knowledge of the legal system and how business law impacts commerce both nationally and internationally. Students learn how to form and own their own business, which employment laws affect them as workers and as a business owner, contract law and how negligence may result in a civil lawsuit. An examination of unethical behaviors and the reality of white collar crimes is also included in this full year course. Group projects, guest speakers and videos will enhance this course by offering students a variety of opportunities to learn and apply their knowledge.

Everything Google – ½ Credit

Grades 9-12

Watch a video produced by QHS students about Everything Google course.

Students today need digital literacy skills to be successful in and outside of the classroom. This course provides students with the knowledge they need to problem solve everyday tasks and prepare them for the most commonly used applications among universities, businesses, and the real world. Students will become thoroughly acquainted with the “G Suite” which includes Google Slides, Forms, Docs, Sheets, Calendar, Earth, Maps, Gmail, Hangouts, Drive, and more! There will be a culminating assessment at the end of the course that gives students the opportunity to achieve a Level I Google Certification. The foundation of this half-year course will give students the essential basics needed to thrive in other classes, as well as their post-high school careers.

Digital Design – ½ Credit

Grades 9-12
Course fulfills the fine arts requirement.

Watch a video produced by QHS students about Digital Design course.

The digital design course fulfills the fine arts requirement. This half-r course combines web design applications and various aspects of graphic design. Students will explore fundamentals and learn the design principles that characterize leading online skills in the 21st Century. This course introduces students to free web design applications such as Google Sites, as well as the more complex software programs of Adobe Dreamweaver, After Effects, Photoshop, and Illustrator. A combination of printed and digital communications are reviewed/practiced throughout the semester. Students will learn today’s industry standard techniques to prepare and produce all types of digital design.

Career & Personal Finance – ½ Credit

Grades 9-12

In this course, students will follow a step-by-step guide for the career preparation process including completing a job application, designing their own resumés and performing mock interviews that will enhance their communication skills. Students will be introduced to basic financial literacy concepts; payroll/paystubs, the banking system, budgeting, credit, determining auto/car loans, long-term investments with stocks and mutual funds, etc.

Principles of Management – SUNY ½ Credit

Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: Minimum GPA 80% or a minimum final average of 80% in a business course.

This course develops both the content and process issues of management. Defines the functional activities of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling, while stressing the areas of communications, decision-making, group dynamics, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership and individual self-improvement. The art of delegation is explored in the issues of authority, accountability, and responsibility.

Students have the opportunity to earn three credits from SUNY Adirondack. SUNY transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing – ½ Credit

Grades 9-12

This course explores the world of marketing primarily in the sports and entertainment industries. Students will learn aspects of the Marketing Mix (Product, Place, Price, Promotion), basic marketing concepts, and the business behind fantasy sports. Students will be using knowledge learned in class to complete course projects that consist of logo creation, digital advertising, professional sports franchises, endorsements/sponsorships, as well as creating and editing TV commercials and much more.

Entrepreneurship – ½ Credit

Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: Career & Personal Finance

Students will learn the basics of planning and launching their own successful business. Students will determine what it takes to start their own business from the ground up and discuss what characteristics successful entrepreneurs must possess. The multiple forms of business organization is examined along with, determining target markets, financing and insuring a business, etc. At the end of the course, students will walk away with a completed business plan for a business of their dreams.

Back to course guide table of contents

English

English 9R – 1 Credit

This course offers study in reading, writing and vocabulary skills practice for the English Language Arts Regents Exam. Attention is given to presentation, discussion and listening skills, as well as academic honesty. Literature includes study of various forms of writing including poetry, plays, graphic novels, and novels from authors such as William Shakespeare, Homer, John Steinbeck, Sandra Cisneros, Patricia McCormick, Laurie Halse Anderson, and Sophocles.

English 10R – 1 Credit

This course is a continuation of the work of English 9R, further developing communication skills and preparing for the English Language Arts Regents Exam given in 11th grade. Literature study includes works from a wide variety of genres and authors including: William Shakespeare, Harper Lee, Elie Wiesel (Night), and Art Spiegelman (Maus). Poetry and short stories will also be studied. Writing tasks include: analysis, personal narrative, creative writing, and a 3-5 page MLA research paper.

English 11R – 1 Credit

This course offers the study of non-literary and literary texts by authors including: William Shakespeare,
F. Scott Fitzgerald, J.D. Salinger, and Sylvia Plath. Students will develop their vocabulary, writing, and speaking skills in this course. Writing will include literary analysis, argument, and creative writing. Students will prepare to take the English Language Arts Regents exam, which is given at the end of this year.

English Language & Literature IB HL Year I – 1 Credit

Grade 11

Juniors registered for English Language and Literature IB HL will be offered a two-year course that cultivates an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the construction of meaning. Students will explore a wide variety of texts over the two years, some of which are studied in translation. The course is focused on the study of non-literary and literary texts. The students explore language through its cultural development and use, its media forms and functions, and its literature. Students develop skills of literary and textual analysis, and also refine their ability to present ideas effectively. A key aim is the development of critical literacy. Frequent writing in various modes is required. Students are assessed through a combination of formal examinations, written coursework, oral activities, seminar discussions, and collaborative projects. Summer assignments required.

Some of the texts the class covers in Year 1 include The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
(summer work), The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Macbeth by William Shakespeare and poetry by Wislawa Szymborska.

All students registered for the IB course must take the IB assessments which begin at the end of the junior year and carry over into the second year. All juniors registered must sit for the NYS English Regents Exam in January.

This course is for highly motivated students.

English Language & Literature IB HL Year II – 1 Credit

Grade 12
Prerequisite: English Language and Literature IB HL Year I

This second year of the English Language and Literature IB HL course builds upon the skills and thinking introduced in Year 1. Through close reading of both literary and non-literary texts, students will begin to consider the role language plays in shaping identity and how texts build upon and transform inherited literary and cultural traditions. The IB exam tests both knowledge of the literature studied in the course
and skills of interpretation and analysis. Students will compile a portfolio of work to be externally assessed and moderated during the spring of senior year. Some texts that students will study include Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried, Albert Camus’s The Stranger, Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner, and Henry David Thoreau’s Walden.

All students registered for the IB course must take the IB examination at the end of the year.
IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

CLASSES FOR SENIORS

These two courses are offered to seniors who have earned an 80 average or higher in their previous English classes. Students take the courses at Queensbury High School. Each course successfully completed yields three college credits at SUNY Adirondack and 0.5 credits at QHS. Students who enroll in both English classes could earn six college credit hours through SUNY. The cost to students’ families is $183/course. Students are encouraged to take both courses, as ENG 101 is a prerequisite for ENG 109.

ENG 101 – Introduction to College Writing – 3 Credits

Grade 12

Instruction and practice in the process of writing, including revision, careful analysis, and the sharing
of each other’s writing. Assignments may include reflection on experience, exposition, and interpretation of a text. Information literacy, in the form of research and documentation, will be presented. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in a second writing course. Students have the opportunity to earn three credits from SUNY Adirondack. SUNY transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

ENG 109 – Elements of Creative Writing – 3 Credits

Grade 12
Prerequisite: ENG 101 with minimum grade of C

This course combines critical study of and practice in various genres of creative writing (poetry, fiction, etc.), with modes of inquiry including research and critical writing. Students have the opportunity to earn three credits from SUNY Adirondack. SUNY transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES FOR SENIORS

TWO English electives satisfy the requirements for senior English. Students MUST choose two elective courses. All elective courses include a
5-10 page research paper. Students who score a 74 or below on the English Language Arts Regents Exam will be placed in Senior Language & Composition as one of the two elective courses.

College Writing – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: A grade of 75% or > on the Common Core ELA Regents Exam

This is a college preparatory course in writing. Various types of writing tasks typical of college assignments such as comparison/contrast, critical, descriptive and persuasive writing are included in addition to the study of documenting techniques and completion of a 5-7 page MLA research paper. Oral communication is also stressed.

Creative Writing – ½ Credit

The course is intended for students who wish to explore their personal writing interests and write original poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Students will read assigned selections in literature with the critical mind of a writer and reflect on the way these pieces of writing are crafted. The class will include a variety of creative writing exercises, craft talks and discussions on the assigned texts. Students will be introduced to workshop methods of critiquing their work. The emphasis will be on revision and writing as a process. A research paper on the life and works of a contemporary writer, journal writing and a portfolio of student work are required.

Senior Language & Composition – ½ Credit

Students who score a 74 or below on the English Language Arts Regents Exam will be placed in Senior Language & Composition as one of the two elective courses. In this one-semester course students will examine the fundamentals of writing. This class enables students to improve writing, critical thinking and vocabulary skills. Students in this course will study/analyze exemplary texts and craft various writing pieces including argument, narrative, and research.

Contemporary Novel – ½ Credit

In this one-semester course students will study fiction written during the past two decades. Students will explore a wide range of contemporary topics and questions important in modern society and culture. Students will read short stories and novels by authors such as Anthony Doerr, Kathryn Stockett, Michael Cunningham, Markus Zusak, Sherman Alexie, Stephen King, and an author of their choice. Writing includes narrative, research, and literary analysis. Students will also create a presentation at the end of the course. All reading, writing, and speaking in this course are designed to promote and showcase creativity and meaningful analysis.

Mythology – ½ Credit

This is a one-semester survey course primarily in Greek and Roman Mythology. Edith Hamilton’s Mythology is the core text however, students will study some world myths and contemporary renderings of ancient myths, as well. Supplemental readings include plays by Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes, Homer’s epic The Iliad, and George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion, among others.

Sports Literature – ½ Credit

This one semester course will provide students with an examination of sports from several perspectives through interaction with literature presented by sports columnists, the media and contemporary authors. Through the use of sports literature and other media forms, the primary objective is to develop a greater sensitivity to the world of sport and the philosophical and sociological relationship between that world
and contemporary society. Reading in the course is selected to be pleasurable and thought provoking, covering a range of modern fiction, non-fiction, poetry, biographies, and commentaries. Writing in the course is designed to be both descriptive and critical in an attempt to provide the student with the opportunity to express personal reactions with confidence and clarity. This is not an NCAA approved English Course.

Science Fiction – ½ Credit

This one-semester course is geared towards students who have an interest in the genre of science fiction. Students will read short stories and novels by authors such as George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, Orson Scott Card, and Stephen King. This class will examine the connections between the text and our own culture/society, as well as our technology. Students will create papers, and projects centered on the concepts and philosophies found within the assigned novels and stories. Science fiction film and television will be explored, too.

Back to course guide table of contents

Foreign language 

The Foreign Language department utilizes a communicative-based language approach. The development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills is based upon useful situations in practical settings. Active class participation and responsible completion of assignments contribute to success in the Queensbury program. A minimum of one credit of foreign language is required for local and Regents diplomas, while three credits are required for the Advanced Regents diploma.

French/Spanish I – 1 Credit

Grades 9-12

French/Spanish I is an introductory, practical study of the French/ Spanish language and culture that focuses on everyday life. French/Spanish I students participate in activities that address all four communicative skill areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. If the course credit and the final exam were not successfully passed in the middle school, an additional year of high school foreign language study is required.

French/Spanish II/Ab initio IB SL YEAR I – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Level I

The continuing development and mastery of the four communicative skill areas – listening, speaking, reading and writing – is the primary focus of the level II curriculum. Students will use the language in a variety of practical situations as well as continuing to study the various cultures in which the target language is spoken. The present, preterit and imperfect tenses are studied. All students registered for the IB course must take the IB exam at the end of the second year.

French/Spanish III Ab initio SL YEAR II – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Level II

Students will continue to expand their grammatical and vocabulary base in an effort to better master communication in the target language. This course incorporates cultural studies relative to everyday life in the French- or Spanish-speaking world. Successful completion of the course and final exam fulfills Checkpoint B for the Advanced Regents Diploma requirement. All Students registered for the IB course must take the IB exam at the end of this year.

French/Spanish IV: Language & Culture – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Level III

The curriculum focuses on mastering grammatical skills acquired in Level III, with an additional student-focused emphasis on cultural exploration and meaningful oral communication. The focus is spoken language with relevant cultural themes such as food, travel, storytelling, film and documentaries on current events. This course aims to prepare students for SUNY Intermediate I.

French/Spanish V: IB SL Year I/SUNY Intermediate I – 1 Credit
(AFRE 221/ASPN 200)

Prerequisite: Level 3

This course focuses on active communication at the intermediate level. This collegiate level course encompasses oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar and composition. To foster a sense of global awareness and preparedness, a variety of teaching strategies are used in this course, with an emphasis on student-centered learning. Highlighting many cultural topics, class time will involve guided discussion, communicative activities and independent study. Students will be provided with an opportunity to earn credit hours from the University at Albany, based on a minimum final average of 73% or higher. Transfer of credit (French: 4 credits, Spanish: 4 credits) varies from institution to institution. All students registered for the IB course must take the IB exam at the end of the second year.

French/Spanish VI: SUNY Intermediate II – 1 Credit
(AFRE 222/ASPN 201)

Prerequisite: SUNY Intermediate French/Spanish I

Representative works of literature and cinema complement this advanced language course, continuing to highlight many cultural topics. Class time will involve guided discussion, communicative activities and independent study. Mastery of advanced communication components in this collegiate level course will enable students to experience authentic language use in various formats. Students will be provided with an opportunity to earn credit hours from the University at Albany, based on a minimum final average of 73% or higher. Transfer of credits (French: 4 credits, Spanish: 4 credits) varies from institution to institution.

French/Spanish VII: IB SL Year II/AP French/Spanish – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: French/Spanish IB SL Year I
SUNY Intermediate French/Spanish I

Students are required to complete summer work in advance of the academic year. This collegiate level course focuses on developing fluent communication skills through exposure to literature, cinema, cultural and global awareness, as well as other authentic experiences via intensive grammar and vocabulary skill building. Students will prepare for and are required to take the AP exam and/or the IB exam in May. Transfer of AP/ IB credit varies from institution to institution.

Back to course guide table of contents

Math

Algebra Common Core R 1 CREDIT

This Regents-level course will cover the state Algebra Common Core curriculum. Topics include: signed numbers, algebraic expressions, first degree equations/inequalities, ratios/proportions, geometric figures, right triangle trig, algebraic fractions, quadratic relations/functions, probability and statistics. The school final exam and state Regents Exam are in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Geometry A 1 CREDIT

Prerequisite: A grade of 65% or better on the Algebra CC Regents Exam and a grade of 65% or better in Algebra class.

The curriculum will cover the first half of the state Geometry Common Core curriculum. Topics include: basic geometry, congruent line segments, angles and triangles, transformations, inequalities, equations of lines, parallel lines and quadrilaterals. The school final exam is in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Geometry Common Core R 1 CREDIT

Prerequisite: A grade of 70% or better on Algebra CC Regents Exam, a class grade of 70% or better, and an Algebra teacher’s recommendation.

The curriculum will cover the state Geometry Common Core curriculum. Topics include: constructions, angles, transformations, congruence, quadrilaterals, dilations, trigonometry, coordinate geometry, geometric solids, and circles. The school final exam and state Regents Exam are in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Geometry Common Core H 1 CREDIT

Prerequisite: A grade of 85% or better on the Algebra CC Regents Exam or a grade of 80% or better on the Algebra CC Regents Exam and a final course average of 90 or better.

The curriculum will cover all topics in Geometry R. In addition, the following topics will be enriched: circles, congruent triangles, quadratic equations, transformations, and constructions. The school final exam and state Regents Exam are in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Algebra II A – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Geometry R

This course will cover approximately half of the Algebra II Common Core curriculum with the emphasis on algebraic skills. Topics include rational expressions, real numbers, relations and functions, transformational geometry, linear inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities, rational exponents, radical expressions, complex numbers, quadratic equations, and functions. The school final exam will be given in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Algebra II Common Core R – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Geometry R and a grade of 65% or better on the Geometry Regents.

The curriculum will cover the Algebra II Common Core curriculum. The curriculum includes polynomials, complex numbers, trigonometry, exponentials, logarithms, probability and statistics, and sequences and series. The Algebra II Common Core Regents Exam will be taken in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Algebra II Common Core H – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Geometry H

The curriculum will cover the Algebra II Common Core curriculum. The course moves at an advanced speed, enriching topics, and it includes polynomials, complex numbers, trigonometry, exponentials, logarithms, probability, and statistics and sequences and series. The Algebra II Common Core Regents Exam will be taken in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Calculus 1 – Credit

Prerequisite: Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches SL Year 1

This course will cover a basics calculus course. The curriculum will cover limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, integrals, and applications of integrals. This course will not be for college credit. Students will take a school final exam in June. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Statistics 1 – Credit

Prerequisite: Passing grade in IB SL Analysis and Approaches, IB SL Applications and Interpretation

The topics for Statistics are divided into four major themes: (1) Exploring Data: observing patterns and departures from patterns; (2) Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure; (3) Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation; and (4) Statistical Inference: Confirming models. Probability is the tool used for anticipating what the distribution of data should look like under a given model. Statistical reference guides the selection of appropriate models. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches 1 – Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II H CC

This one-year course covers the IB Mathematics Analysis and Approaches curriculum. Topics include: Number and algebra, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability, and Calculus. Students will meet three out of four blocks. All students will complete the mathematical exploration. All students will take the IB exam in May and a school final in June. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches Year 1 – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II H CC

This course covers the first half of the IB Mathematics Analysis and Approaches curriculum. Topics include: Number and Algebra, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability. Students will take a school final in June. All students seeking IB credit must take the IB exam and complete the mathematical exploration which both occur in year 2. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches Year 2 – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches Year 1

This course covers the second half of the IB Mathematics Analysis and Approaches curriculum. Topics include: Statistics and Probability and Calculus. All students will take the IB exam in May and complete the mathematical exploration prior to this. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Mathematics: IB SL Applications and Interpretation Year 1 – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II R CC

This course covers the first half of the IB Mathematics Applications and Interpretation curriculum. Topics include: Number and Algebra, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, and Statistics and Probability. Students will take a school final in June. All students seeking IB credit must take the IB exam and complete the mathematical exploration which both occur in year 2. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Mathematics: IB SL Applications and Interpretation Year 2 – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: IB SL Applications and Interpretation Year `=1

This course covers the second half of the IB Mathematics Applications and Interpretation curriculum. Topics include: Statistics and Probability, Geometry and Trig, and Calculus. All students will take the IB exam in May and complete the mathematical exploration prior to this. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

AP Calculus BC – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches

This course will follow the AP Calculus BC curriculum and will include the following topics: Limits and Continuity, Differentiation: Definition and Fundamental Properties, Differentiation: Composite, Implicit,
and Inverse Functions, Contextual Applications of Differentiation, Analytical Applications of Differentiation, Integration and Accumulation of Change, Differential Equations, Applications of Integration, Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates, and Vector-Valued Functions, Infinite Sequences and Series. All students must take the AP examination in May. AP transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-89 calculator is required.

AP Calculus AB – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Mathematics IB SL Analysis and Approaches

This course will follow the AP Calculus AB curriculum and will include the following topics: Limits and Continuity, Differentiation: Definition and Fundamental Properties, Differentiation: Composite, Implicit,
and Inverse Functions, Contextual Applications
of Differentiation, Analytical Applications of Differentiation, Integration and Accumulation of Change, Differential Equations, and Applications
of Integration. All students must take the AP examination. AP transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies. TI-89 calculator is required.

Computer Programming & Graphical Arts – ½ Credit

Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: A grade of > 65% on the CC Geometry Regents Exam

An introduction to computer programming through activities and projects, often including dynamic digital art. Students will program with Scratch, and Processing languages, work with Raspberry Pi hardware, and design and print 3D models by using the made up computer programming language.

Advanced Computer Programming – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Computer Programming & Graphical Arts

This course builds on the Computer Programming & Graphical Arts course. Students will use Python, Java, Processing and Greenfoot to investigate computer programming in depth and to create projects of their choosing. Previous projects include 2D and 3D computer games, interactive dynamic art, interactive music visualization, investigation of the microcomputer Raspberry Pi, and much more.

Consumer Math – ½ Credit

Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: A passing grade on Algebra (Common Core) Regents. A scientific calculator is required.

A one-semester course designed for juniors and seniors who have passed the Algebra Common Core Regents Exam. This course has an emphasis on mathematical operations involved in consumer-related topics. Through the use of laboratory-based activities, students will explore banking services, investments, costs of owning a car, housing, buying on credit, income, and wages among other topics. A school final is taken on the completion of the course.

Applied Math – ½ Credit

Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: A passing grade on the Common Core Algebra Regents

This course has an emphasis on topics from the Algebra and Geometry courses applied to real-life situations, and the majority of the work is project-based. Topics will include measuring, area and perimeter, construction estimations, nutrition graphs, problem solving, analysis of advertisements, calculations using a computer spreadsheet application, and a three-dimensional analysis among others. A school final is taken at the completion of the course.

A scientific calculator is required.

Career Track Math – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Geometry A

This course is designed to give students hands-on experience with math that they will use in their future careers. The curriculum includes: real world use of integers, operations with integers, fractions, percentages, ratios and proportions, financial math, probability, and functions. There are many projects that the students will complete. A school final exam will be given in June.

TI-84 Plus calculator is required.

Back to course guide table of contents

Music

Mixed Chorus – 1 Credit

Sinfonietta Orchestra – 1 Credit

Concert Choir – 1 Credit

Mixed Chorus/Symphonic Band – 1 Credit

Symphonic Band – 1 Credit

Concert Choir/Concert Band – 1 Credit

Concert Band – 1 Credit

Mixed Chorus/String Orchestra – 1 Credit

String Orchestra (younger group) – 1 Credit

Concert Choir/Sinfonietta Orchestra – 1 Credit

Band

Band is a cumulative course of study beginning in grade 5 and continuing through grade 12. The general objective is enrichment of the educational program by the study of high quality music. Specific objectives are to develop individual instrumental capabilities and develop an understanding of musical theory. Instrumental performance skills are developed through rehearsals and daily practice routines. Correlated activities include NYSSMA solo and ensemble performance and jazz band.

Band members begin instruction in grade 5 but others may be admitted after successfully performing an audition for the directors. In addition to daily rehearsals and weekly rotational lessons, students are required to attend all concerts and activities when scheduled. The more advanced instrumental group is the Concert Band, which is composed of students who have reached a high level of achievement and are able to perform at a NYSSMA level 5. The Symphonic Band is composed of students who perform at a NYSSMA level 3-4. Students are assigned to either Concert Band or Symphonic Band based on their achievement level. Students who wish to choose the appropriate instrumental group should seek the advice of Mr. Margison.

Choral Music

Choral Music is a cumulative course of study beginning in grade 4 and continuing through high school. The general objective is enrichment of the educational program by the study of high quality music of varying styles and cultures both sacred and secular. More specific objectives are to develop understanding of music theory and to develop individual and group vocal capabilities. These objectives are best achieved through daily rehearsal. A pull out sectional lesson is scheduled once per each A-D day cycle, and participation in scheduled concerts is also required.

Orchestra

Orchestra is a cumulative course of study beginning in grade 5 and continuing through grade 12. The general objective is enrichment of the educational program by the study of high quality music. Specific objectives are to develop an understanding of orchestral music, music theory and developing individual proficiency at a high school level of performance on their instruments. Correlated activities include solo and ensemble playing in addition to performing in the advanced, by audition only, Chamber Ensemble. Orchestra members are generally those who have participated in orchestral groups in the lower grades; however, others may be admitted at the discretion of Mr. Verheyn. Besides regular rehearsals and small-group lessons, students are required to attend concerts and other activities when scheduled.

The String Orchestra is comprised of students who perform at a NYSSMA level 3-4. Students progress to Sinfonietta Orchestra (NYSSMA level 4-6) when they demonstrate upper level performance skills, musical maturity and leadership within the orchestra.

Students who wish to choose the appropriate ensemble should seek the advice and endorsement of Mr. Verheyn.

Music Production – ½ Credit

Students will gain an understanding of the elements of music, music theory and basic keyboard knowledge in addition to basic composition and songwriting. Students will also learn how to do music notation through MIDI sequencing, editing, and recording with Audacity, GarageBand, and Logic Pro X. Students will learn the Apple OS (music industry standard). The curriculum is project-based and designed to allow for exploratory learning and to maximize creativity. This is a half-year course offered to students of all musical abilities.

Enjoyment of Music – 1 Credit

This course fulfills the New York State Fine Arts requirement. It is offered every other year and is scheduled for the 2020-21 school year.

This course is for students who enjoy music and want to experience different aspects of the art form. Students will play instruments, listen to music, create music, and discover the importance of music in our everyday lives. Original projects will be created.

Music Theory – 1 Credit

Grades 11-12; exception for grade 10 students wishing to take IB Music.
Recommended for those seeking a music career, studying music as an elective in college, and those with an interest in music analysis.

Study of the basics in music theory (scales, modes, intervals, triads and rhythms) with practical application through the writing of music and ear training. The chief emphasis is the study of tonal harmony, four part writing, musical analysis and musical elements that have retained their validity from about 1600 to 1900.

Music IB SL – 1 Credit

Grades 11 or 12
Highly Recommended: Music Theory. It is suggested that students in the solo performance component have private instruction on voice or their chosen instrument.

The IB Music SL one-year course seeks to develop students’ knowledge and potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively. This course introduces high school music students to college level music studies. Those studies include studying more in-depth music theory, composition, and music history as well as preparing for solo and/or group performances. Students are required to study musical perception and actively listen to a wide range of music from different parts of the world, musical cultures and time periods. They also develop aural perception and understanding of music by learning about musical elements, including form and structure, notations, musical terminology and context.

Students will be assessed on their ability to demonstrate the following: knowledge, understanding and perception of music in relation to time, place and culture; appropriate musical terminology to describe and reflect their critical understanding of music; comparative analysis of music in relation to time, place and cultures; creative skills through exploration, control and development of musical elements; and possibly performance skills through solo or group music making, critical-thinking skills through reflective thought.

Interested students should be proficient either vocally or instrumentally. All students registered for the IB course must take the IB examination at the end of the year. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Back to course guide table of contents

Physical education

Health – ½ Credit

Required of all students.

The concept of total health is aimed toward well being of sound body and mind. This course focuses on increasing awareness of both quality and quantity of life. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and application addressing physical, mental and emotional health. Topics include wellness, decision making, physical fitness nutrition, mental and emotional health, communication, drug education, reproductive health, infectious and noninfectious disease, prevention and community health.

Physical Education – ½ Credit

Required of all students.

The physical education (PE) program consists of activities based on achieving a sound, healthy body and a proper attitude toward wholesome physical activities. The activities are invaluable in promoting social, emotional, intellectual and physical growth. The program stresses individual development, group games and activities, and instruction in lifetime sports such as biking, tennis, golf and bowling.

Education Law and the Commissioner’s Regulations require that all students participate in physical education each year they attend school. Two credits of PE are mandated for graduation, but all full-time students shall be enrolled in PE. A student attending school part time who has earned two PE credits may request to be excused from PE, allowing the student to maintain employment.

Students who are permanently or temporarily handicapped shall be assigned to the adaptive PE laboratory for an individualized program.

Along with regular classes, students are encouraged to participate in interscholastic, intramural, and extramural athletic programs.

Zero Block Physical Education – ½ Credit

Tuesday/Thursday 6:20 – 7:10 a.m.

The Zero Block Physical Education class is an elective class that consists of activities based on achieving
a sound, healthy body and a proper attitude toward wholesome physical activities following our overall PE program. The activities are invaluable in promoting social, emotional, intellectual and physical growth. The program stresses individual development and instruction through strength training. The course will provide information, techniques and practices to help prevent injuries, increase muscular strength & endurance and increase mobility & flexibility. Students will be required to show proper progression in strength and conditioning throughout the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own transportation to Zero Block in the morning on designated days. Due to this as well as the advanced nature of this course, preference in this class will be given to QHS Juniors and Seniors. Students who have obtained a full schedule will also receive preferential acceptance into this course as an alternate course for General Physical Education. Students must have at least one full year of General Physical Education as a prerequisite. Confirmed attendance in this course will be held in 3rd Quarter of the previous school year. .

SUNY Athletic Training & Health Careers –  ½ Credit

Grade 11 or 12

An introduction to current philosophies, procedures and practices related to the care and prevention of athletic injuries. Students will study contemporary principles and methods of conditioning, prevention, and first-aid care, along with the fundamentals of taping and wrapping techniques, inspection and physical examination, and training room procedures. Students will become oriented with the different systems of the body as well as the practice for each medical specialist responsible. Students will gain first-hand knowledge as student assistants while working with the varsity sports programs under the direction of the certified athletic trainer.

Students enrolled have the opportunity to earn college credit from SUNY Adirondack. SUNY transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

National College Athletic Association eligibility requirements

A student-athlete entering an NCAA Division I or II member institution must meet certain requirements to be eligible for financial aid awarded by the institution or to practice and compete on an intercollegiate team during the first year of attendance as outlined below:

Academic eligibility requirements

Students must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements for Division I:

  • Complete 16 core courses:
    • Four years of English
    • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
    • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it)
    • One additional year of English, math or natural/physical science
    • Two years of social science
    • Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy
  • Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of their seventh semester. Once students begin their seventh semester, they may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses to improve their core-course GPA.
  • Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in their core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching their core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale, which balances test scores and core-course GPA. If students have a low test score, they need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If they have a low core-course GPA, they need a higher test score to be eligible.

Additional information is available through athletics or Counseling Centers.

Courses NOT APPROVED by NCAA:
  • Career Track Math
  • Applied Math
  • Consumer Math
  • Accounting
  • Materials Science
  • Sports Literature

Algebra A has a value of ½ credit, according to NCAA eligibility requirements.

Please see your counselor by the fall of your senior year for more information and visit the NCAA’s website

Back to course guide table of contents

Science

Biology/The Living Environment Regents Lab – 1 Credit

A Regents-level course with a state-mandated requirement. Following are key ideas presented in the course: living things are both similar to and different from each other and nonliving things (biology), organisms inherit genetic information in a variety of ways that result in continuity of structure and function between parents and offspring (genetics), individual organisms and species change over time (evolution), the continuity of life is sustained through reproduction and development (reproduction), organisms maintain a dynamic equilibrium that sustains life (homeostasis/body systems), plants and animals depend on each other and their physical environment (ecology), human decisions and activities have had a profound impact on the physical and living environment (human impacts on the environment/ecology).

Biology IB HL Year I – 1 Credit

Co-requisite: Chemistry R

Biology IB HL I is a challenging, two-year science course offered to students who wish to understand living organisms at the molecular, cellular and ecological levels. The course aims to provide content, understand how experimental data is collected, analyzed and evaluated, develop skills in experimental design, and understand how topics discussed in biology have ethical implications and social consequences. Topics to be covered in the course include ecology, evolution, cells, biochemistry, physiology, microbiology and biotechnology. Self-directed laboratory investigations will be conducted throughout the course, where students will design and conduct appropriate experiments. This laboratory work will be used to configure a portion of their IB Biology HL grade at the end of the course.

All students registered for the IB course must take the IB exam at the end of the second year.

Biology IB HL Year II – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology IB HL Year I

This is the second portion of the Biology IB HL course. Students will continue to build on curriculum and skills developed during year I. The process of experimental research including design of experiments, analysis of data, and evaluation of findings will continue to be studied and fine tuned. Additional topics studied during the course will include genetics, metabolic cellular processes, plant biology, evolution, and physiology. This portion of the Biology IB HL course will include mandatory student participation and collaboration on a large group multidisciplinary science project that will be presented to the community.

All students registered for this course must take the IB Biology HL exam at the end of the course. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Biology IB SL – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: A grade of >65% on the Chemistry Regents Exam

This one-year course will help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. It will also provide them with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. It will consist of lecture, group work, teacher-designed labs and student-designed labs. The course of study includes the following topics: biochemistry (molecular biology), cells, genetics, nucleic acids, proteins, evolution, ecology and evolution, and plant and animal physiology. The course includes a multi-disciplinary science project and work on other optional topics.

All students registered for this course must take the IB exam at the end of the year. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Earth Science – Physical Setting Lab – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Biology R

The Earth Science course is an intriguing look at the earth from the deep inner core to the far reaches of space. Students learn the interwoven content of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Throughout the year, as young scientists, materials and ideas are analyzed and grappled with during practical application and hands-on activities. By the end of this course, students will have a deeper understanding of earth systems, Common Core skills, and engineering practices.

Advanced Regents Chemistry – 1 Credit

Prerequisites: A final grade of > 85% on two science Regents exams

Co-requisites: Algebra II H/R CC

This course is designed for the college-bound student who is interested in pursuing a career in science. The curriculum will emphasize topics included on the SAT II in chemistry and will include all Regents topics. In addition to the Chemistry Regents, there is a comprehensive final assessment. Some topics included are quantum numbers, the ideal gas equation, in-depth stoichiometry, colligative properties of solutions, pH calculations, limiting reactants, equilibrium constants and expressions, and prediction of products of chemical reactions.

Chemistry – Physical Setting Lab – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Two Regents science courses completed and a grade of > 75 on the Earth Science Regents Exam

Recommended: Algebra II CC

The science that treats the composition and transfiguration of matter along with the corresponding energy changes. Topics covered include: the atomic structure of matter including quantum theory, nuclear reactions, acid base theory, ionization and dissociation, stoichiometry, principles involved in reactions, the study of periodic law, organic chemistry, chemical equilibrium, oxidation – reduction reactions.

Chemistry IB HL Year I/AP Chemistry – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II CC and a grade of > 85% on the Chemistry Regents Exam

AP/IB Chemistry is a second-year chemistry course designed to increase the depth of your understanding of chemistry concepts. An emphasis is placed on inquiry and critical thinking skills including: problem solving, mathematical reasoning and experimental investigations. Topics of study include: quantitative chemistry, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation reduction, and organic chemistry. Laboratory work is an integral component of this course. This course will be taught at the college level and is recommended for students planning a career in science. This course incorporates AP Chemistry topics as well as additional assessments and topics included for the IB Chemistry HL course outline.

AP students must take the Advanced Placement Chemistry examination in May. All Students registered for the IB course must take the IB exam at the end of the second year. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Advanced Placement credit and IB credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Chemistry IB HL Year II – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry IB HL Year I

Chemistry IB HL Year II is a third-year chemistry course taught at the college level and recommended for students planning a career in science. An emphasis is placed on inquiry and critical-thinking skills including: problem solving, mathematical reasoning and experimental investigations. Topics of study include organic chemistry (e.g., nucleophilic substitution reactions, reaction pathways, stereoisomerism, and condensation reactions) and may include energy (e.g., fossil fuels, solar energy, nuclear fission/fusion, global warming, photovoltaic and dye-sensitized solar cells, rechargeable batteries, and fuel cells). Laboratory work is an integral component of this course, and the IA will be completed during this year as well as the Group 4 project.

All students registered for this course must take the IB examination at the end of the year. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Physics – Physical Setting Lab – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: A grade of > 65% on the Chemistry Regents Exam

Recommendations: Algebra II CC

This course generally covers the following areas: forces, motion, work and energy, heat, light, sound, electricity, and the standard model of atomic structure. These are studies in relation to the application of problems in all areas.

Physics IB SL/SUNY Physics – 1 Credit

Co-requisite: Precalculus

Prerequisite: A grade of > 65% for the final average in Regents Physics or a grade of > 85% on the Chemistry Regents Exam

This one-year, co-sat course is a rigorous physics course that will cover the IB/SL and SUNY Physics curriculum. The basic core topics include measurement, mechanics, thermal physics, oscillations and waves, electric currents, fields and forces, atomic and nuclear physics, energy, power, and climate change. The students will also be introduced to optional topics that may include optics, quantum physics, digital technology, astrophysics or electromagnetic waves. The course introduces the students to scientific methods and techniques which are needed for scientific investigations. Practical investigations are an integral part of the curriculum. Students are required to research a scientific problem, develop hypothesis, design an experiment, conduct investigations and draw conclusions.

All students will be required to take the Regents Exam in June. All students registered for the IB course must take the IB examination at the end of the year. Students enrolled in SUNY Physics have the opportunity to earn college credit from SUNY Adirondack. SUNY and IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Environmental Science Topics – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Two credits of Regents science

This course will study the fundamental concept of ecology: how living organisms interact with and are dependent on their environment and each other. These interactions result in a flow of energy and a cycling of materials that are essential for life. Emphasis is placed on how human decisions and activities have had a profound impact on the physical and living environment. The course will allow for students to explore, explain, and apply conceptual understandings and skills necessary to be environmentally literate.

Anatomy & Physiology – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Two credits of Regents science

The program focuses on the structure and function of the human body. As an overview class, body systems are studied with an emphasis placed on appreciating the body from an “owner’s manual” point of view. Class activities include labs, dissections, case studies, current events, research, and projects.

Introduction to Forensics – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Two credits of Regents science

Introduction to Forensics is a course designed to introduce students to the fields of forensic science and criminology. Students will participate in a variety of activities that will enable them to learn the history and fundamentals of applications that crime scene investigators and laboratory analysts employ. Students will be expected to scrutinize crime scene evidence and utilize the learned techniques to solve crimes.

Foundations in Chemistry – ½ Credit

Prerequisite: Two credits of Regents science

Foundations in Chemistry is a one-semester course that focuses on traditional chemistry topics including, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, chemical formulas and equations, solutions, stoichiometry, and acids and bases. Lab activities will be performed for each topic. Students interested in pursuing a career in the health sciences who are not taking Regents Chemistry can take this course. There will be a written final exam.

Back to course guide table of contents

Social studies

Global History & Geography I – 1 Credit

Grade 9

Grade 9 begins with the Paleolithic Era and the development of the first civilizations, continues with an examination of classical societies, and traces the expansion of trade networks and their global impact. The course emphasizes the key themes of interactions over time, shifts in political power, and the role of belief systems. While the course emphasizes the importance of historical and spatial thinking, all of the social studies practices and standards are included in the study of global history and geography.

Global History & Geography II – 1 Credit

Grade 10

Grade 10 begins with a snapshot of the world circa 1750. The course continues the study of world history chronologically up to the present. Several concepts are woven throughout the course, including industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, conflict, technology, and the interconnectedness of the world. The last three key ideas focus on global issues, applying a more thematic approach. The culminating assessment is the Global History & Geography Regents Exam.

AP World History – 1 Credit

This course is aligned with state global history and geography curriculum. It is designed to help students better understand diverse cultures and the nature of international relationships. This class may be taken to fulfill the 10th grade social studies requirement or as an elective in grade 12.

All students must take both the Global History and Geography Regents Exam and the AP World History exam. AP transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

U.S. History & Government R – 1 Credit

Grade 11

This course covers the history of the United States from the 1700s to the present. Students will also study basic constitutional issues and the application of those principles to both historical and contemporary life. The culminating assessment is the U.S. History and Government Regents Exam.

History of the Americas IB HL Year I 1 CREDIT
The International Baccalaureate Programme in History is an intensive, two-year study and is designed to provide highly motivated students with a rigorous program that will examine various aspects of history in great depth. In addition to extensive content knowledge, students will develop reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills. Course content combines a history of the United States, Canada and Latin America. The course will follow a chronological study of U.S. History while including more in-depth study and analysis of the following three topics: U.S. Civil War – causes, course and effects 1840-77; The Great Depression and the Americas (mid 1920s – 1939); and Civil Rights and social movements in the Americas. A key focus of the course is the development of historic analysis and critical thinking. Students are assessed through a combination of formal examinations, written class work, presentations, and collaborative projects. A summer assignment is required. All students must take the US History and Government Regents Exam in January. All students registered for IB History of the Americas – Year I, must complete an independent research paper or Internal Assessment, as directed by the IBO.

History of the Americas IB HL Year II – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: History of Americas IB HL Year I

This course fulfills the state-mandated social studies requirements for grade 12.

This course focuses on 20th century world history, fostering an understanding of major historical events in global context. Students will make comparisons between similar and dissimilar solutions to common human situations, whether they be political, economic, or social. It invites comparisons between, but not judgments of, different cultures, political systems and national traditions. Students enrolled in this course will also fulfill the ½ credit of Economics and ½ credit of Participation in Government required for graduation.

All students registered for the IB course must take the IB examination at the end of the year. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Psychology IB HL Year I – 1 Credit

Grades 11-12

This course covers the first half of the Psychology IB HL curriculum. It is a rigorous college level course based on the requirements of the IB curriculum to provide an in-depth introduction to general principles of psychology and meets two out of the four day block schedule. Students will investigate the study of human behavior through biological, cognitive and sociocultural levels of analysis; explore abnormal psychology; and explore the developmental psychology. Students will be challenged to conceptualize, understand hidden meanings, and draw conclusions from the readings and research. Students will investigate a psychological principle and conduct their own research to complete the requirements of the internal assessment which will be completed during year one.

All students enrolled in the course must take the IB exam at the end of year two.

Psychology IB HL Year II – 1 Credit

Grade 12

Prerequisite: Psychology IB HL Year l

This course covers the second half of the Psychology IB HL curriculum. It is open to students who have successfully completed Psychology IB HL Year I. This course aims to develop awareness of how research findings can be applied to better understand human behavior. Students learn to understand the biological, cognitive, and sociocultural influences on human behavior and explore alternative explanations of behavior.
All students enrolled in this course must take the IB Psychology exam. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

AP Government & Politics – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: U.S. History and Government

Course fulfills the state-mandated senior social studies requirement.

This course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course studies the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics. It also addresses the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Topics to be covered include: the constitution, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, mass media, civil rights and civil liberties, and the national government (i.e., congress, the presidency and the courts).

All students must take the AP exam in the spring. AP transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

AP Microeconomics – 1 Credit

Course fulfills the state-mandated senior social studies requirement.

According to the College Board, “The purpose of an AP course in Microeconomics is to provide thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.”
All students must take the AP exam in the spring.

AP transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Economics – ½ Credit

Grade 12

Course fulfills half of the state-mandated senior social studies requirement.

This course includes information about economic theory, economic systems, business, entrepreneurship, personal finance, money and banking, and globalization. Economics fulfills the Regents mandate that all students complete a half-credit course in economics.

Participation in Government – ½ Credit

Grade 12

Course fulfills half of the state-mandated senior social studies requirement.

National, state and local government are all studied in this course. The role of the individual citizen in the governmental process is discussed and analyzed. Practical experience, guest lectures and field trips enhance the class work in this course.

Economics IB SL – 1 Credit

Course fulfills the state-mandated senior social studies requirement, including both the Participation in Government and Economics state graduation requirements.

This one-year course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms, markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with the economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories will be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.
All students enrolled in this course must take the IB exam at the end of the year. IB transfer credit varies from institution to institution. Please consult the admissions offices of your college choices to learn of their policies.

Model Organization of American States (MOAS) – ½ Credit

Grade 12

This course is open to students in grade 11 as an elective, upon approval of the instructor.
Formerly offered as Latin American Studies.

Fulfills Participation in Government, which is half of the state-mandated senior social studies requirement.
This course, patterned after the Organization of American States Model Assembly for university students, is designed to engage students in the important policy issues of the Americas for the 21st Century. The course culminates with a three-day model assembly on the campus of SUNY Plattsburgh where students will work through cooperative learning in committee and as a member of a team, interacting with students from schools throughout Northern New York. This course, provided in conjunction with SUNY Plattsburgh, allows students the opportunity to earn three undergraduate credits if taken for college credit. There is a fee associated with taking the course for college credit.

Back to course guide table of contents

Special education

Commencement Credentials

Career Development and Occupational Studies Commencement Credential (CDOS)

The Career Development and Occupational Studies Commencement Credential (CDOS) can become a pathway toward graduation for a high school diploma for all students or can be earned by students with an Individual Education Plan, through the Committee of Special Education, who do not complete diploma requirements due to their disabilities. The credential serves as greater evidence of students’ ability to gain employment. Standards for the CDOS credential emphasize real-world skills and experiences that can help students succeed after graduation. It documents and requires preparation for entry-level employment with:

  • Opportunities to earn a high school diploma and to participate and progress in the general curriculum.
  • The development and annual review of a career plan to ensure active engagement in career exploration.
  • Evidence of commencement level knowledge and skills (CDOS learning standards).
  • 216 hours of CTE coursework and/or work-based learning experiences, of which at least of 54 hours must be in work-based learning experiences.
    Employability profile.
Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential (SACC)

The Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential (SACC) is a graduation certificate for students with severe disabilities showing they have completed at least 12 years of school, excluding kindergarten, with instruction and services designed to help them meet their goals for living, learning and working after leaving school. SACC is for students who are eligible to take the New York State Alternate Assessment. Students can participate in school- and community-based work preparation experiences. Instruction is based on the CDOS learning standards.

SACC certificates are accompanied by an “exit summary” that documents achievement in areas identified as important for post-secondary living.

English Skills – 1 Credit

Curricular areas include the development of the writing process, communication skills, literature and vocabulary enhancement. A continued development of the ninth-grade curriculum is stressed as well as familiarization of the format and skill inclusion of the English Language Arts Common Core Regents Exam.

Social Studies Skills – 1 Credit

Grade 9: A class on global history that covers current topics, news stories with respect to culture, geography and world interactions.

Grade 10: Continuation of the ninth-grade curriculum and preparation for the Global History Regents Exam.

Grade 11: A class on U.S. history that covers the 1700’s to present, including discussions of constitutional issues and the application of these issues to both historical and contemporary life. Preparation for the U.S. History Regents Exam are included.

Grade 12: Civic skills are presented, focusing on government studies covering citizenship, current events and economic studies.

Math Skills – 1 Credit

Students develop math skills utilizing calculators and a variety of manipulative resources. Content covers reading charts, using calculators, banking and preparation for the Integrated Algebra Regents Exam. It is integrated into Career Pathways classes or career and technical education programs.

Science Skills – 1 Credit

A life science course that concentrates on biology through the use of American Guidance Service textbook and laboratory activities. This course is a continuation of life sciences and an introduction to earth science. The focus is on map reading, weather and measurement.

Workforce/Essential Job Skills – 2 Credits

Academics will focus on career opportunities, job skills, requirements and responsibility, and guest speakers. Students are placed in in-house workforce opportunities to reinforce the skills they have learned.

Career Pathways – 4 Credits

Students will continue to learn about employment skills and opportunities through job placements, community service and off-campus community visitations. Job placement will occur at local business establishments.

Physical Education (PE) Skills – 2 Credits (1 year = ½ credit)

Grades 9-12: Physical education is required by New York State and is a part of the educational program each of the four years of high school.

Back to course guide table of contents

Technology education

Technology education courses teach students how to deal with real life situations of a technical nature. Course offerings in areas such as Design and Drawing for Production, Civil Engineering, Principles of Engineering, Video Production and Residential Construction all stress the application of skills and knowledge acquired in other curricular areas, while presenting new and challenging material specific to technical subjects. Students participate in experiences which provide a practical outlet for the use of math, science, art, social studies and communication. Part of this experience involves learning how tools, machines, materials and processes are important to everyday life. Students learn how products are designed, manufactured and constructed and also examine the impacts these products have on the natural and social environment. Another important facet of this curriculum is that students can explore possible occupational interests, which may lead to fulfilling careers.

The courses in technology may be taken as electives by any student and would be of particular benefit to those who are considering a technical career in fields such as architecture or engineering. Some students may choose to complete a 5-unit Career and Technical Education (CTE) sequence to achieve a Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation in lieu of the LOTE requirement. Students who complete 2.5 credits in a Technology Academy strand receive a Technology Academy seal on their diplomas. Students who complete Project Lead the Way (PLTW) courses may receive college credit at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

In addition, Project Lead the Way students who complete 3 PLTW electives including the senior project capstone course Engineering Design and Development will receive a graduation distinction.

Project Lead the Way (PLTW): Computer Integrated Manufacturing – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: DDP

Manufactured items are part of everyday life, yet most students have not been introduced to the high-tech, innovative nature of modern manufacturing. This course illuminates the opportunities related to understanding manufacturing. At the same time, it teaches students about manufacturing processes, product design, robotics and automation. Students can earn a virtual manufacturing badge recognized by the National Manufacturing Badge system.

Project Lead the Way (PLTW): Design & Drawing for Production (DDP) – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra
Fulfills the fine arts requirement for graduation.

Designed for 9th and 10th grade students, the major focus of DDP is the design and process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

Project Lead the Way (PLTW): Principles of Engineering – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: DDP
Co-Requisite: Algebra II CC

Designed for 11th and 12th grade students, this survey course exposes students to major concepts students will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials and kinematics. Students develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions.

Project Lead the Way (PLTW): Civil Engineering & Architecture – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: DDP

Designed for 10th-12th grade students, the major focus of CEA is the design of both residential and commercial architecture. Through hands-on projects, students apply architectural standards and document their work. Students use industry standard Building Information Modeling (BIM) software. After designing structures students apply the concepts of Civil Engineering. Calculations for structural analysis, stormwater runoff, fresh water supply, wastewater management are completed for all structures designed. Students will use equipment to survey a building site, gather soil samples and conduct tests to determine the makeup of those soil samples.

Project Lead the Way (PLTW): Engineering Design and Development (Senior Capstone Design Project) – 1 Credit

Grade 12 Only
Prerequisite: Suggested (2) previous PLTW courses and course instructor approval. PLTW Graduation Distinction

The knowledge and skills students acquire throughout PLTW Engineering come together in Engineering Design and Development as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing Engineering Design and Development ready to take on any post-secondary program or career.

Innovation – ½ Credit

Grades 9-12

This is a passion based course designed for students to tinker, create, invent, produce, write, organize events, program or engineer. Any project that gives back to the community is encouraged. Students who take this class will have the opportunity to work on their choice of projects without the pressure of numeric grades, failure or time constraints. Students will develop projects of their own choosing based on their interests or passions, research possible solutions, connect with outside professionals, collaborate with peers and experts, and develop products or services. Students who take this class will be given opportunities to explore a wide range of tools and supplies to help them develop their project. This class is offered as a full year (1credit) or as a one-semester (½ credit), pass/fail class.

Video Productions I & II – ½ Credit courses

Grades 9-12

Watch a video produced by QHS students about the video production courses.

Students enrolled in video production courses will discover a world of emerging technologies, as well as time tested storytelling, script-writing assignments, and on-site sportscasting sessions. The ability to create video based projects will allow students to enter the world of visual media which is so prevalent in society today. Students gain practical experience in media news gathering, working as part of a team to produce news reports and complete newscasts. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate accurate, fair and factual oral and written communication skills in reporting. They will produce and demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts and theories in the presentation of news. In addition, the mastery of skills used in this class will be used in other courses throughout Queensbury High School.

*Note: Video production I is an introductory half-year course and prerequisite of Video Production II. Video production II is also a half-year course that is a continuation of Video Production I.

Residential Electricity – ½ Credit courses

This is a course that teaches how electricity is generated and transported to a home environment. Students will learn universal electrical symbols and how to read and follow plans for installing various residential circuits. Students will be introduced to The National Electrical Code and complete hands wiring activities that simulate several different applications in a residential setting. Students are responsible for organizing and maintaining an industry set of tools to complete all of the required activities. As a final project students will wire a residential structure, storage shed, cabin, bunkhouse, etc.

Introduction to Architectural Drawing – ½ Credit

Co-requisite: Algebra R
Course fulfills the fine arts requirement.

Introduction to Architecture is a half year program that introduces high school students to architectural ideas, principles, and methods of exploring architectural problems in a lab setting. Students will learn to use industry standard software in order to produce various sets of architectural plans.

Residential Construction – 1/2 Credit

Co-requisite: Algebra R

This is a one-semester course where students participate as a class construction crew and build a residential structure of some type. Example: storage shed, cabin, bunkhouse, etc. All students enrolling in this course must have taken carpentry as a prerequisite to receive their OSHA 10 hour training and foundational tool use skills. Students will be expected to layout parts of the structure and use a variety of power tools and air tools to frame, side and finish an actual structure.

Carpentry – 1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra R

Carpentry is the prerequisite to the Residential Construction class. This 1 semester course will focus on hand tool and machine tool use and safety and all students will receive OSHA 10 hour safety training and earn their OSHA 10 certification card which is active for life. This is a hands-on class where students will learn how to read plans and construct projects that will enhance their carpentry skills learned in the middle school Career Connections curriculum and required for the carpenters union. Students will also be introduced to the terminology used by carpenters on the job site as they relate to residential construction (joists, studs,rafters, trusses, etc). Students will learn about industry standards for framing material sizes, window and door sizes and how to layout floors, walls and roofs.

Help Desk and IoT – 1 Credit

Grades 9-12

The Helpdesk and Internet of Things course, is a full year, hands on study of our device connected world and how to troubleshoot and fix devices within our district. Students enrolled will be expected to run our Queensbury High School Student Help Desk. If you like taking computers apart and rebuilding them this is the course for you. During any downtime, we will learn about and create internet connected “smart devices.” During the second semester you will have the opportunity in this class to create any smart device that you choose.

Back to course guide table of contents